1. Sensory subtypes and associated outcomes in children with autism spectrum disorders. Autism Res. 2016 May 2.  Ausderau KK, Sideris J, Little LM, Furlong M, Bulluck JC, Baranek GT5. Abstract: Sensory features are prevalent and heterogeneous across children with ASD and these features have been associated with child outcomes. Identification of clinically defined sensory subtypes may enhance our understanding of unique phenotypes that have implications for etiology, prognosis, and intervention. This longitudinal study used a national online survey aimed to identify associations of previously validated sensory subtypes to specific child and family characteristics and functional outcomes [vineland adaptive behavior scale-II (VABS) and parenting stress index short form (PSI)]. The sensory experiences questionnaire-3.0 was collected from caregivers with children with ASD, ages 2-12, at two time points (Time 1, n = 1307, Time 2, n = 884), 1 year apart. Functional outcomes assessments were collected at the second time point. A latent profile transition analysis (LPTA) was used to test associations, and results indicated that the attenuated-preoccupied subtype presented with the significantly lowest levels of VABS adaptive behavior composite scores compared to the other three sensory subtypes. Both the VABS maladaptive behavior index and the total PSI score were significantly highest in the extreme-mixed subtype. These results underscore the clinical utility of this subtyping approach for differentiating characteristics and functional outcomes associated with clinically defined sensory phenotypes. These findings may have implications for better understanding etiology, prognosis, and more precise targets for interventions designed to ameliorate sensory difficulties, and ultimately mitigate negative developmental consequences and parenting stress.
  2. The Link Between Infantile Colic and Migraine. Qubty W, Gelfand AA. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2016 May;20(5):31. Abstract: Infantile colic is a self-limiting disorder of excessive infant crying or fussiness that peaks at 6 weeks of age and typically improves by 3 months of age. The etiology of infantile colic has yet to be definitively elucidated, but there is increasing research to support its relationship to migraine. The aims of this review are to present recent research investigating the connection between infantile colic and migraine. The importance of identifying this connection is useful in reducing invasive and potentially harmful investigations and to identify age appropriate pharmacologic interventions that would be safe in this population.